Paul Innes retiring as AJA chief executive

Monday 11 February 2019, 6:15pm

Paul Innes is to retire as chief executive of the Australian Jockeys' Association but will remain chairman of the National Jockeys Trust.

Innes, who will retire from the AJA at the end of March, played a key role in the establishment of the organisation in 2001 and also the creation of the NJT three years later.

In 2011, Innes was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia for his services to the thoroughbred industry.

AJA chairman Des O'Keeffe paid tribute to the contribution Innes has made to improving the lives of Australia's jockeys.

"In his time as CEO, the AJA has achieved any number of great outcomes for Australia's jockeys," O'Keeffe said.

"Thanks largely to Paul's efforts, the AJA is a well-established, highly respected and extremely effective stakeholder association, strongly representing the interests of Australia's jockeys at a national level as well as providing valuable assistance to the various state jockey associations in dealing with local issues.

"Paul Innes' time as our chief executive sees Australia's jockeys in a much, much better position now compared to 2001.

"On behalf of the entire riding group, past and present, I thank Paul for his unwavering commitment to improving the lives of Australia's jockeys and wish him well into the future.

"We are pleased that he will remain as chairman of the National Jockeys Trust."

– AAP

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